Regalarle teléfonos móviles a madres y mujeres pobres.
Y una tarjeta pre-paga al mes, por ejemplo equivalente a cinco dólares.
[A madres y mujeres. Los hombres uruguayos, pico y pala. ]

Se pueden comprar a algún país europeo, usados. Es probable que se consiguieran regalados o por una suma insignificante.
El efecto estimulante de la economía sería inmediato. Mejoraría su conexión con la economía, la seguridad contra el delito (en un país con alta y creciente criminalidad), el empleo.
Un impacto inmediato, muy superior a regalarle ordenadores a los niños, que no son por supuesto actores económicos -sus padres sí.

Hay un estudio económico en EE.UU. que lo demuestra

STUDY: PHONING IN A MAJOR ECONOMIC BOOST FOR U.S.? $11 BILLION IN JOBS, INCOME
POSSIBLE IF CELL PHONES PUT IN HANDS OF LOW-INCOME AMERICANS NOW WITHOUT THEM
Strong “Safety Blanket” Effect Seen as Half of Americans Already Have Used Cell Phones in
Emergency Situations; Unique Study Reviews Looks at 100,000+ Consumers to Define Wealth-
Creating and Safety Potential of More Cell Phones in U.S.
WASHINGTON, D.C.///March 26, 2008///Cell phones play a much bigger role in helping Americans get work, make money and respond in emergency situations than previously was thought to be the case, according to a first-of-its-kind study by Nicholas P. Sullivan, author of You Can Hear Me Now: How Microloans and Cell Phones Are Connecting the World’s Poor to the Global Economy and a visiting scholar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Released today by the independent New Millennium Research Council (NMRC) think tank, the Sullivan report concludes that providing cell phones to the 38 percent of America’s 45 million poorest households now without them — including millions of seniors, Hispanics, African-Americans and rural residents — could help them get work or make money worth $2.9 billion-$11 billion.
Entitled “Cell Phones Provide Significant Economic Gains for Low-Income American Households,”
the groundbreaking Sullivan study is based on two surveys: a scientific poll by Opinion Research
Corporation (ORC) of 1,005 Americans and a statistically large online sampling of 110,000 prepaid cell phone users. The study is the first in the U.S. to zero in on potential economic and public safety benefits to those in the bottom two quintiles of household income (less than $35,000), who are much less likely to own cell phones. According to the Sullivan report, those who do not now own a cell phone tend to be older (37 percent are retired), less educated (29 percent have a high school education or less), low income (38 percent make less than $35,000 a year) or unemployed (30 percent).

http://blog.wired.com/sterling/2008/04/telecom-thinkta.html

Y en África el impacto del teléfono móvil dinamiza la economía de comunidades enteras.
accra-ghana.jpg

Por Armando

Deja un comentario

Tu dirección de correo electrónico no será publicada.